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Publikationen


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2020

Applicability of Torrefied Sunflower Husk Pellets in Small and Medium Scale Furnaces

Kienzl N, Margaritis N, Isemin R, Zaychenko V, Strasser C, Kourkoumpas DS, Grammelis P, Klimov D, Larina O, Sytchev G, Mikhalev A. Applicability of Torrefied Sunflower Husk Pellets in Small and Medium Scale. Waste and Biomass Valorization. 2020;275:122882.

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The aim of this paper is to test the applicability of upgraded agricultural biomass feedstock such as torrefied sunflower husks during combustion in small and medium heating applications. Sunflower husk is formed in large quantities at enterprises producing sunflower oil and can be used as biofuel. However, big problems arise due to the low bulk density of husks and the rapid growth of ash deposits on the heating surfaces of boilers. In order to solve these problems, it was proposed to produce pellets from husks, and to subject these pellets to torrefaction. After torrefaction, net calorific value was increased by 29% while the risk of high temperature corrosion of boilers was reduced. Signs of ash softening neither occurred in combustion of raw nor in combustion of torrefied sunflower husk pellets. High aerosol emissions, already present in raw sunflower husk pellets, could not be mitigated by torrefaction. First combustion results at medium scale furnaces indicated that sunflower husk pellets (both raw and torrefied) in a commercial boiler < 400 kW, operated in a mode with low primary zone temperatures (< 850 °C), meet current emission limits. Regarding the future upcoming emission limits according to the European Medium Combustion Plant Directive, additional measures are required in order to comply with the dust limits.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2020

Biomass pyrolysis TGA assessment with an international round robin

Anca-Couce A, Tsekos C, Retschitzegger S, Zimbardi F, Funke A, Banks S, Kraia T, Marques P, Scharler R, de Jong W, Kienzl N. Biomass pyrolysis TGA assessment with an international round robin.Fuel.2020;276:118002.https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fuel.2020.118002

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The large variations found in literature for the activation energy values of main biomass compounds (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in pyrolysis TGA raise concerns regarding the reliability of both the experimental and the modelling side of the performed works. In this work, an international round robin has been conducted by 7 partners who performed TGA pyrolysis experiments of pure cellulose and beech wood at several heating rates. Deviations of around 20 – 30 kJ/mol were obtained in the activation energies of cellulose, hemicellulose and conversions up to 0.9 with beech wood when considering all experiments. The following method was employed to derive reliable kinetics: to first ensure that pure cellulose pyrolysis experiments from literature can be accurately reproduced, and then to conduct experiments at different heating rates and evaluate them with isoconversional methods to detect experiments that are outliers and to validate the reliability of the derived kinetics and employed reaction models with a fitting routine. The deviations in the activation energy values for the cases that followed this method, after disregarding other cases, were of 10 kJ/mol or lower, except for lignin and very high conversions. This method is therefore proposed in order to improve the consistency of data acquisition and kinetic analysis of TGA for biomass pyrolysis in literature, reducing the reported variability.


Peer-reviewed publications | 2020

Combined influence of inorganics and transport limitations on the pyrolytic behaviour of woody biomass

Almuina-Villar H, Sommersacher P, Retschitzegger S, Anca-Couce A, Dieguez-Alonso A. Combined influence of inorganics and transport limitations on the pyrolytic behaviour of woody biomass. Chemical Engineering Transactions. 2020.80:73-78

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A deeper understanding and quantification on the influence of inorganic species on the pyrolysis process, combined with the presence of heterogeneous secondary reactions, is pursued in this study. Both chemical controlled and transport limited regimes are considered. The former is achieved in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) with fine milled biomass in the mg range, while the latter is investigated in a particle level reactor with spherical particles of different sizes. To account for the influence of inorganics, wood particles were washed and doped with KCl aqueous solutions, resulting in K concentrations in the final wood of around 0.5% and 5% on dry basis. Gas species and condensable volatiles were measured online with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzer. The removal of inorganic species delayed the pyrolysis reaction to higher temperatures and lowered char yields. The addition of inorganics (K) shifted the devolatilization process to lower temperatures, increased char and water yields, and reduced CO production among others. Higher heating rates and temperatures resulted in lower char, water, and light condensable yields, but significantly higher CH4 and other light hydrocarbons, as well as CO. The increase in these yields can be attributed, at least in part, to the gas phase cracking reactions of the produced volatiles. Larger particle size increased the formation of char, CH4 and other light hydrocarbons, and light condensables for low and high pyrolysis temperatures, while reduced the release of CO2 and H2O. This novel data set allows to quantify the influence of each parameter and can be used as basis for the development of detailed pyrolysis models which can include both the influence of inorganics and transport limitations when coupled into particle models.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2020

Consequential Life Cycle Assessment of energy generation from waste wood and forest residues: The effect of resource-efficient additives

Corona B, Shen L, Sommersacher P, Junginger M. Consequential Life Cycle Assessment of energy generation from waste wood and forest residues: The effect of resource-efficient additives. Journal of Cleaner Production 2020. 259:120948.

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Combustion of waste wood can cause slagging, fouling and corrosion which lead to boiler failure, affecting the energy efficiency and the lifetime of the power plant. Additivation with mineral and sulfur containing additives during waste wood combustion could potentially reduce these problems. This study aims at understanding the environmental impacts of using additives to improve the operational performance of waste wood combustion. The environmental profiles of four energy plants (producing heat and/or power), located in different European countries (Poland, Austria, Sweden and Germany), were investigated through a consequential life cycle assessment (LCA). The four energy plants are all fueled by waste wood and/or residues. This analysis explored the influences of applying different additives strategies in the four power plants, different wood fuel mixes and resulting direct emissions, to the total life cycle environmental impacts of heat and power generated. The impacts on climate change, acidification, particulate matter, freshwater eutrophication, human toxicity and cumulative energy demand were calculated, considering 1 GJ of exergy as functional unit. Primary data for the operation without additives were collected from the power plant operators, and emission data for the additives scenarios were collected from onsite measurements. A sensitivity analysis was conducted on the expected increase of energy efficiency. The analysis indicated that the use of gypsum waste, halloysite and coal fly ash decreases the environmental impacts of heat and electricity produced (average of 12% decrease in all impacts studied, and a maximum decrease of 121%). The decrease of impacts is mainly a consequence of the increase of energy generation that avoids the use of more polluting marginal technologies. However, impacts on acidification may increase (up to 120% increase) under the absence of appropriate flue gas cleaning systems. Halloysite was the additive presenting the highest benefits.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2020

Detailed experimental investigation of the spatially distributed gas release and bed temperatures in fixed-bed biomass combustion with low oxygen concentration

Archan G, Anca-Couce A, Gregorc J, Buchmayr M, Hochenauer C, Gruber J, Scharler R. Detailed experimental investigation of the spatially distributed gas release and bed temperatures in fixed-bed biomass combustion with low oxygen concentration. Biomass and Bioenergy. 2020;141:105725

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This publication focuses on the experimental investigation of a novel small-scale fuel flexible biomass combustion technology with a fixed-bed employing a low oxygen concentration. It was obtained through a low primary air ratio and the additional supply of recirculated flue gas. The plant was operated with spruce wood chips, which contained three different mass fractions of water, and miscanthus pellets. All relevant components of the released gas above the fixed-bed were measured, as well as the 3D bed temperature distribution. The balances confirmed a high experimental data consistency. Therefore, it was possible to determine the location of the four different conversion zones inside the fixed-bed: drying, pyrolysis, char gasification and char oxidation. The reduction of CO2 to CO in the char reduction zone worked efficiently across the entire grate area. Furthermore, the results showed that the water mass fraction of the fuel did not influence the dry product gas composition, but significantly affected the location for the release of pyrolysis products such as tars. It was found that the low oxygen concentration in the fixed-bed combined with flue gas recirculation was an effective method to reduce bed temperatures and therefore its inorganic emissions while significantly increasing feedstock flexibility. The investigations provided fundamental findings on the conversion and release behavior of the new technology under real operating conditions and are very useful for further experimental work and CFD simulations targeting the reduction of PM and NOX emissions.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2020

Evaluation of heat transfer models at various fluidization velocities for biomass pyrolysis conducted in a bubbling fluidized bed

von Berg L, Soria-Verdugo A, Hochenauer C, Scharler R, Anca-Couce A. Evaluation of heat transfer models at various fluidization velocities for biomass pyrolysis conducted in a bubbling fluidized bed. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer. 2020;160:120175

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Four different models for heat transfer to the particles immersed in a fluidized bed were evaluated and implemented into an existing single particle model. Pyrolysis experiments have been conducted using a fluidized bed installed on a balance at different temperatures and fluidization velocities using softwood pellets. Using a heat transfer model applicable for fluidized beds, the single particle model was able to predict the experimental results of mass loss obtained in this study as well as experimental data from literature with a reasonable accuracy. A good agreement between experimental and modeling results was found for different reactor temperatures and configurations as well as different biomass types, particle sizes – in the typical range of pellets - and fluidization velocities when they were higher than . However, significant deviations were found for fluidization velocities close to minimum fluidization. Heat transfer models which consider the influence of fluidization velocity show a better agreement in this case although differences are still present.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2020

Multi-stage model for the release of potassium in single particle biomass combustion

Anca-Couce A, Sommersacher P, Hochenauer C, Scharler R. Multi-stage model for the release of potassium in single particle biomass. Fuel. 2020:280:118569.

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The release of potassium during biomass combustion leads to several problems as the emissions of particle matter or formation of deposits. K release is mainly described in literature in a qualitative way and this work aims to develop a simplified model to quantitatively describe it at different stages. The proposed model has 4 reactions and 5 solid species, describing K release in 3 steps; during pyrolysis, KCl evaporation and carbonate dissociation. This release model is coupled into a single particle model and successfully validated with experiments conducted in a single particle reactor with spruce, straw and Miscanthus pellets at different temperatures. The model employs same kinetic parameters for the reactions in all cases, while different product compositions of the reactions are employed for each fuel, which is attributed to differences in composition. The proposed model correctly predicts the online release at different stages during conversion as well as the final release for each case.


Scientific Journals | 2020

Off-gassing reduction of stored wood pellets by adding acetylsalicylic acid

Sedlmayer I, Bauer-Emhofer W, Haslinger W, Hofbauer H, Schmidl C, Wopienka E. Off-gassing reduction of stored wood pellets by adding acetylsalicylic acid. Fuel Processing Technology 2020.198:106218.

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During transportation and storage of wood pellets various gases are formed leading to toxic atmosphere. Various influencing factors and measures reducing off-gassing have already been investigated. The present study aims at applying an antioxidant, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), to reduce off-gassing from wood pellets by lowering wood extractives oxidation. Therefore, acetylsalicylic acid was applied in industrial and laboratory pelletizing processes. Pine and spruce sawdust (ratio 1:1) were pelletized with adding 0-0.8% (m/m) ASA. Glass flasks measurements confirmed off-gassing reduction by adding ASA for all wood pellets investigated.The biggest effect was achieved by adding 0.8% (m/m) ASA in the industrial pelletizing experiments where the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCtot) was reduced by 82% and a reduction of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 70% and 51%, respectively, could be achieved. Even an addition of 0.05% (m/m) ASA led to off-gassing reduction by >10%. A six week storage experiment to investigate the long-term effectivity of ASA addition revealed, that antioxidant addition was effective in reducing CO-, CO2- and VOCtot-release, especially during the first four weeks of the storage experiment, after which time the relative reduction effect was significantly decreased.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2020

Online determination of potassium and sodium release behaviour during single particle biomass combustion by FES and ICP-MS

Paulauskas R, Striūgas N, Sadeckas M, Sommersacher P, Retschitzegger S, Kienzl N. Online determination of potassium and sodium release behaviour during single particle biomass combustion by FES and ICP-MS. Science of the Total Environment. 2020;746:141162.

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This study focuses on the determination of alkali release from wood and straw pellets during combustion. The aim is to expand the knowledge on the K and Na release behaviour and to adopt chemiluminescence-based sensors for online monitoring of alkali detection which can be applied for the prevention of fouling formation in low quality biomass combustion plants. Flame emission spectrometry (FES) was used for optical detection of chemiluminescence spectra of K and Na using optical bandpass filters mounted on an ICCD (Intensified Charge Coupled Device) camera. FES data were verified by additional experiments with a single particle reactor (SPR) coupled with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Using both techniques, the release profiles of K and Na during a single pellet combustion at 1000 °C were determined and obtained K* and Na* emission intensities directly correlated with the results from the ICP-MS. It was determined that the emission intensity of alkali radicals depends on alkali concentrations in the samples and K and Na radical emission intensities increase with increasing alkali amounts in the samples. The ICP-MS data revealed that the release of K and Na mainly takes place during the stage of devolatilization. During devolatilization, almost all potassium and sodium are released from wood samples, while only 65–90% of K and 74–90% of Na are released from straw samples. Based on the results, the flame emission spectroscopy technique is capable to fully detect released alkali metals in the gas phase during combustion and proves a possibility to use flame emission sensors for monitoring the release of alkali species from biomass during combustion processes.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2020

Prediction of slag related problems during fixed bed combustion of biomass by application of a multivariate statistical approach on fuel properties and burner technology

Rebbling A, Näzelius IL, Schwabl M, Feldmeier S, Schön C, Dahl J, Haslinger W, Boström D, Öhman M, Boman C. Prediction of slag related problems during fixed bed combustion of biomass by application of a multivariate statistical approach on fuel properties and burner technology. Biomass and Bioenergy 2020.137:105557.

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Slag is related to the melting properties of ash and is affected by both the chemical composition of the fuel ash and the combustion parameters. Chemical analysis of slag from fixed bed combustion of phosphorus-poor biomass show that the main constituents are Si, Ca, K, O (and some Mg, Al, and Na), which indicates that the slag consists of different silicates. Earlier research also points out viscosity and fraction of the ash that melts, as crucial parameters for slag formation. To the authors’ knowledge, very few of the papers published to this day discuss slagging problems of different pelletized fuels combusted in multiple combustion appliances. Furthermore, no comprehensive classification of both burner technology and fuel ash parameters has been presented in the literature so far. The objective of the present paper was therefore to give a first description of a qualitative model where ash content, concentrations of main ash forming elements in the fuel and type of combustion appliance are related to slagging behaviour and potential operational problems of a biomass fuel in different small- and medium scale fixed bed appliances.

Based on the results from the combustion of a wide range of pelletized biomass fuels in nine different burners, a model is presented for amount of slag formed and expected severity of operational problems. The model was validated by data collected from extensive combustion experiments and it can be concluded that the model predicts qualitative results.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2020

Scale-up methodology for automatic biomass furnaces

Barroso G, Nussbaumer T, Ulrich M, Reiterer T, Feldmeier S. Scale-up methodology for automatic biomass furnaces. Journal of the Energy Institute 2020.93:591-604.

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This work presents a methodology to perform the scale-up of a solid fuel furnace to a higher heat output with maintaining or improving the burn-out quality. As basis to derive the scale-up concept, an example of a 35 kW screw burner for biomass fuels is investigated. Based on the Pi-theorem, the relevant dimensionless parameters are derived and similarity rules for the scale-up are proposed as follows: As initial conditions, the height to diameter ratio of the combustion chamber, the mean Reynolds number in the combustion chamber and the mean square velocity through the combustion chamber shall be kept constant or in the case of the Reynolds number may also increase. Additionally the effective momentum flux ratio between the secondary air injected in the combustion chamber and the gases from the pyrolysis and gasification section also shall be kept constant to maintain the mixing conditions between combustible gases and secondary air. Finally the thermal surface load on the screw also shall be kept constant. The influence of different scale-up approaches on thermal surface load, gas velocity, pressure losses, Reynolds number and height-to-diameter ratio are compared and discussed and a scaling approach to increase the heat output from 35 kW to 150 kW is described. For a theoretical validation of the scale-up, CFD simulations are performed to investigate the predicted pollutant emissions and the pressure loss for the scaled 150 kW furnace.


Scientific Journals | 2019

Ammonia as Promising Fuel for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Experimental Analysis and Performance Evaluation

Stöckl B, Preininger M, Subotic V, Schröttner H, Sommersacher P, Seidl M, Megel S, Hochenauer C. Ammonia as Promising Fuel for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Experimental Analysis and Performance Evaluation. ECS Transactions; The Electrochemical Society 2019.91:1601-1610

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n the course of this study the direct utilization of ammonia in different types of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), such as anode- and electrolyte-supported SOFC, is investigated. Experiments in low fuel utilization, exhibited excellent performance of ammonia in SOFCs, although the power outputs of equivalent hydrogen/nitrogen fuels were not attained due to the incomplete endothermic ammonia decomposition. Next, the single cells were operated under high fuel utilization conditions and methane was added to the humidified ammonia stream, where they showed excellent ammonia- and methane conversions. The stability of the cells used was proven over a period of at least 48 hours with a variety of fuel mixtures. Post mortem scanning electron microscopy analysis of the anode micro-structures indicated nitriding effects of nickel, as microscopic pores and enlargements of the metallic parts occurred. Finally, a long-term test over 1,000 hours was carried out using a ten-layer stack consisting of electrolyte-supported cells.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2019

Applicability of Fuel Indexes for Small-Scale Biomass Combustion echnologies, Part 2: TSP and NOx Emissions

Feldmeier S, Wopienka E, Schwarz M, Schön C, Pfeifer C. Applicability of Fuel Indexes for Small-Scale Biomass Combustion echnologies, Part 2: TSP and NOx Emissions. Energy & Fuels. 2019.33:11724-11730.

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Several studies pointed out that emission release is related to the concentration of particular elements in the fuel. Fuel indexes were developed to predict emissions of biomass combustion based on the elemental composition of the fuel. This study focuses on emissions of different biomass combustion technologies for domestic heating. Based on combustion tests with a wide range of fuel qualities we validated fuel indexes from the literature. We calculated the values for predicting total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission of 39 biomass-derived fuels. Combustion tests conducted in 10 different small-scale appliances provided experimental data. The combustion technologies had a nominal load between 6 and 140 kWth. We measured TSP and NOx emissions during the stable phases of the experiments. The evaluation considered 529 combustion test intervals. All tested indexes for predicting the TSP corresponded well to the measured values. The correlation analysis confirmed that these indexes are associated with each other and are basically dominated by the concentration of potassium. The results regarding NOx emissions confirm previous findings from the literature by showing the typical nonlinear relation between nitrogen content of the fuel and NOx in the flue gas. Overall the comparison of the fuel indexes with the practical data indicated also an influence of the combustion technologies.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2019

Applicability of the SOFC technology for coupling with biomass-gasifier systems: Short- and long-term experimental study on SOFC performance and degradation behaviour

Subotić V, Baldinelli A, Barelli L, Scharler R, Pongratz G, Hochenauer C, Anca-Couce A. Applicability of the SOFC technology for coupling with biomass-gasifier systems: Short- and long-term experimental study on SOFC performance and degradation behaviour. Applied Energy. 2019.256:113904

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Coupling biomass gasification with high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) is a promising solution to increase the share of renewables and reduce emissions. The quality of the producer gas used can, however, significantly impact the SOFC durability and reliability. The great challenge is to ensure undisturbed operation of such system and to find a trade-off between optimal SOFC operating temperature and system thermal integration, which may limit the overall efficiency. Thus, this study focuses on experimental investigation of commercial SOFC single cells of industrial size fueled with different representative producer gas compositions of industrial relevance at two relevant operating temperatures. The extensive experimental and numerical analyses performed showed that feeding SOFC with a producer gas from a downdraft gasifier, with hot gas cleaning, at an operating temperature of 750 °C represents the most favorable setting, considering system integration and the highest fuel utilization. Additionally, a 120 h long-term test was carried out, showing that a long-term operation is possible under stated operating conditions. Local degradation took place, which can be detected at an early stage using appropriate online-monitoring tools.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2019

Experimental investigation on biomass shrinking and swelling behaviour: Particles pyrolysis and wood logs combustion

Caposciutti G, Almuina-Villar H, Dieguez-Alonso A, Gruber T, Kelz J, Desideri U, Hochenauer C, Scharler R, Anca-Couce A. Experimental investigation on biomass shrinking and swelling behaviour: Particles pyrolysis and wood logs combustion. Biomass and Bioenergy 2019;123:1-13.

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Biomass is a suitable energy source to reduce the carbon footprint and increase the use of renewable energy. However, the biomass exploitation is still slowed by many technical issues. In most practical applications, such as gasification or combustion devices, it is important to predict the fuel physical behavior in order to determine the emissions and heat release profile as well as for modeling and design purposes. Within this paper, the study of the dimensional evolution of a biomass fuel (beech wood) in pyrolysis and combustion processes were carried out with the use of the image analysis tool. Sizes from 15 mm to 300 mm characteristic length range were employed in the experiments and the collected data were related to the mass loss and temperature evolution of the biomass particle. It was found that for all the fuel sizes employed a similar volume reduction (60%–66%) was obtained at the end of pyrolysis. However, for the small particles with minor intra-particle gradients shrinkage took place mainly at the end of conversion, while for bigger particles the size variation patter was more linear. Furthermore, swelling was detected in the pyrolysis experiments, and it was higher for a bigger particle size, while cracking and fragmentation phenomena was observed for large wood logs combustion in the stove.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2019

High Utilization of Humidified Ammonia and Methane in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: An Experimental Study of Performance and Stability

Stöckl B, Preininger M, Subotic V, Gaber C, Seidl M, Sommersacher P, Schröttner H, Hochenauer C. High Utilization of Humidified Ammonia and Methane in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: An Experimental Study of Performance and Stability. Journal of The Electrochemical Society 2019.166:F774-F783.

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Wastewater contains high amounts of unused energy in the form of dissolved ammonia, which can easily be converted into gaseous humidified ammonia via membrane distillation, thus providing a potential fuel for solid oxide fuel cells. This study presents comprehensive investigations of the use of humidified ammonia as the primary fuel component in high-fuel utilization conditions. For these investigations, large planar anode- and electrolyte-supported solid oxide single cells were operated at the respective appropriate temperatures, 800°C and 850°C. Fueled with ammonia, both cells exhibited excellent ammonia conversion ( > 99.5%) in addition to excellent performance output and fuel utilization. In 100 h stability tests performed at 80% fuel utilization, the cells exhibited stable performance, despite scanning electron microscopy analyzes revealing partial impairments to the nickel parts of both cells due to the formation and subsequent decomposition of nickel nitride. This study also demonstrates that methane is a perfect additional fuel component for humidified ammonia streams, as steam supports the internal reforming of methane. Alternating and direct current as well as electrochemical impedance measurements with a variety of ammonia/steam/methane/nitrogen fuel mixtures were used to evaluate the performance potential of the cells, and proved their stability over 48 h in highly polarized conditions.


Scientific Journals | 2019

Interrelation of Volatile Organic Compounds and Sensory Properties of Alternative and Torrefied Wood Pellets

Poellinger-Zierler B, Sedlmayer I, Reinisch C, Hofbauer H, Schmidl C, Kolb LP, Wopienka E, Leitner E, Siegmund B. Interrelation of Volatile Organic Compounds and Sensory Properties of Alternative and Torrefied Wood Pellets. energy & fuels 2019.33:5270-5281.

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The increasing demand for wood pellets on the market, which is caused by their excellent combustion properties, inspires the production as well as the utilization of alternative biomass pellets as fuel. However, the emission of volatile organic compounds gives pellet materials a distinct odor or off-odor, which is directly perceived by the end user. Thus, there is an urgent need for knowledge about the emitted volatile organic compounds and their potential formation pathways as well as their contributions to odor properties of the pellets. In this study, pellets made of biomass energy crops (i.e., straw or miscanthus), byproducts from the food industry (i.e., rapeseed, grapevine, or DDGS (dried distillers grains with solubles from beer production)), or eucalyptus, as well as torrefied pinewood and torrefied sprucewood were investigated with respect to the emitted volatile compounds and their possible impact on the pellet odor. Headspace solid-phase microextraction in combination with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry was used to enrich, separate, and identify the compounds. Techniques used in sensory science were applied to obtain information about the odor properties of the samples. A total of 59 volatile compounds (acids, aldehydes and ketones, alcohols, terpenes, heterocyclic compounds, and phenolic compounds) were identified with different compound ratios in the investigated materials. The use of multivariate statistical data analysis provided deep insight into product–compound interrelation. For pellets produced from bioenergy crops, as well as from byproducts from the food industry, the sensory properties of the pellets reflected the odor properties of the raw material. With respect to the volatiles from torrefied pellets, those volatiles that are formed during the torrefaction procedure dominate the odor of the torrefied pellets covering the genuine odor of the utilized wood. The results of this work serve as a substantiated basis for future production of pellets from alternative raw materials.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2019

New experimental evaluation strategies regarding slag prediction of solid biofuels in pellet boilers

Schön C, Feldmeier S, Hartmann H, Schwabl M, Dahl J, Rathbauer J, Vega-Nieva D, Boman C, Öhman M, Burvall J. New experimental evaluation strategies regarding slag prediction of solid biofuels in pellet boilers. Energy & Fuels. 2019.33:11985-11995

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Pellet boilers and pellet stoves are widely used for heat production. But in most cases, only specific wood pellets with a low ash content are approved due to the increased risk of slagging and limited deashing capacity. The ash fusion test (AFT), according to prCEN/TS 15370-1, is currently the only standard method for the prediction of slagging. This method is not feasible for all biomass fuel types, since sometimes the characteristic temperatures cannot be determined or the characteristic shapes do not occur for temperature determination. Furthermore, the method is costly and requires complex instrumental infrastructure. Hence, a demand for more expressive or more rapid methods to characterize slag formation potential of fuels is often claimed. Based on a literature study, four such laboratory test methods were chosen, partly adapted, and then experimentally investigated. These methods included thermal treatment of the fuel itself or the ashes of the fuel and were the rapid slag test, CIEMAT, the slag analyzer, and the newly developed pellet ash and slag sieving assessment (PASSA) method. Method performance was practically assessed using 14 different biomass fuel pellets, which were mainly from different assortments of wood, but also herbaceous or other nonwoody fuels. The results from the tests with these four alternative methods were evaluated by comparing to both results from standard AFT and results from full-scale combustion tests performed over a maximum of 24 h. Seven different pellet boilers were assessed, of which one boiler was used to apply all 14 test fuels. According to the granulometric ash analysis (i.e., the ratio of >1 mm-fraction toward total ash formed), the sensitivity of the new test methods to depict slagging phenomena at a suitable level of differentiation was assessed. Satisfactory conformity of the boiler ash assessment (reference) was found for both, the slag analyzer and the PASSA method. The latter may, in particular, be seen as a promising and relatively simple low-input procedure, which can provide more real-life oriented test results for fixed-bed combustion. The standardized AFT could, however, not sufficiently predict the degree of slag actually formed in the reference boiler, particularly when only wood fuels are regarded.


Scientific Journals | 2019

Real-life emission factor assessment for biomass heating appliances at a field measurement campaign in Styria, Austria

Sturmlechner R, Schmidl C, Carlon E, Reichert G, Stressler H, Klauser F, Kelz J, Schwabl M, Kirchsteiger B, Kasper-Giebl A, Höftberger E, Haslinger W. Real-life emission factor assessment for biomass heating appliances at a field measurement campaign in Styria, Austria. WIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environment 2019.236:221-231

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Biomass combustion is a major contributor to ambient air pollution. Thus, knowing the real-life emissions of biomass heating systems is crucial. Within the project Clean Air by biomass a field measurement campaign was conducted. 15 biomass heating appliances were tested in households at the end user according to their usual operation. Emission factors for gaseous and particulate emissions, as well as for the genotoxic and carcinogenic substance benzo(a)pyrene, were evaluated and compared to current proposed European and Austrian emission factors used for emission inventories. Moreover, the shares of particles and benzo(a)pyrene in hot and cooled flue gas were determined. Results showed a high variability of emissions in the field. Highest values and ranges occurred for room heaters (TSPtotal: 226 mg/MJ). Biomass boilers showed clearly lower emission factors (TSPtotal: 184 mg/MJ) in the field than room heaters and also than the proposed European and Austrian emission factors, in many cases. Emission factors for tiled stoves showed a similar trend (TSPtotal: 67 mg/MJ). The share of condensable particles in the flue gas was remarkable. Especially benzo(a)pyrene was found mostly in the condensable fraction of the particles.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2019

Single large wood log conversion in a stove: Experiments and modelling

Anca-Couce A, Caposciutti G, Gruber T, Kelz J, Bauer T, Hochenauer C, Scharler R. Single large wood log conversion in a stove: Experiments and modelling. Renewable Energy 2019.143:890-897.

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Natural draft wood log stoves for residential bioheat production are very popular due to the low fuel costs, the ecological aspect of a renewable energy source and the visual appeal of the flame. However, they have rather high pollutant emissions, specially of unburnt products. The description of large wood logs conversion in stoves needs to be improved to allow a process optimization which can reduce these emissions. The transient conversion of a single wood log in a stove is experimentally investigated with test runs quenching the log after defined time intervals and measuring the flue gas composition and temperatures in the log and stove. The experiments have been described with a volumetric single particle model, which predicts with good accuracy the log conversion until a time of around 30 min, when pyrolysis is almost ending. At that point, log fragmentation takes place and smaller fragments are detached from the log falling onto the bed of embers. Despite the increase in external surface area, char oxidation takes place at a moderate rate. This last stage of wood log conversion in a stove is the most challenging to model. Finally, preliminary recommendations are provided for reducing CO emissions in wood log stoves.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2018

Determination of off-gassing and self-heating potential of wood pellets - Method comparison and correlation analysis

Sedlmayer I, Arshadi M, Haslinger W, Hofbauer H, Larsson I, Lönnermark A, Pollex A, Schmidl C, Stelte W, Wopienka E, Bauer-Emhofer W. Determination of off-gassing and self-heating potential of wood pellets - Method comparison and correlation analysis. Fuel 2018;234:894-903.

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Several methods for identifying the phenomena of self-heating and off-gassing during production, transportation and storage of wood pellets have been developed in recent years. Research focused on the exploration of the underlying mechanisms, influencing factors or the quantification of self-heating or off-gassing tendencies. The present study aims at identifying a clear correlation between self-heating and off-gassing. Thus, different methods for determining self-heating and off-gassing potentials of wood pellets are compared. Therefore, eleven wood pellet batches from the European market were analyzed. For this investigation, three methods for the determination of self-heating, like isothermal calorimetry, oxi-press and thermogravimetric analysis, and four methods for off-gassing, like volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions measurements, gas phase analysis of stored pellets in a closed container by offline and by glass flask method and determination of fatty and resin acids content, were performed. Results were ranked according to the self-heating and off-gassing tendency providing a common overview of the analyzed pellets batches. Relations between different methods were investigated by Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Evaluation of the results revealed an equal suitability of offline and glass flask methods to predict off-gassing tendency and indicated a very significant correlation with isothermal calorimetry for the identification of self-heating tendency. The thermogravimetric analysis as well as the fatty and resin acids determination proved to be insufficient for the exclusive assessment of self-heating and off-gassing tendency, respectively.


Scientific Journals | 2018

Development of a compact technique to measure benzo(a)pyrene emissions from residential wood combustion, and subsequent testing in six modern wood boilers

Klauser F, Schwabl M, Kistler M, Sedlmayer I, Kienzl N, Weissinger A, Schmidl C, Haslinger W, Kasper-Giebl A. Development of a compact technique to measure benzo(a)pyrene emissions from residential wood combustion, and subsequent testing in six modern wood boilers. Biomass and Bioenergy. April 2018, 111: 288-300.

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Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are emitted during incomplete combustion of organic materials and are particularly harmful to human health. As a representative of PAHs, Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is restricted by the European Union to an annual average value of 1 ng m−3 in ambient air. This threshold is significantly exceeded during the heating season in various regions. Residential wood combustion furnaces are considered to be a major source for BaP pollution.

In this research, a compact sampling method for BaP measurements was validated. Afterwards, the method was used to assess emissions from modern automatic wood boilers, in order to obtain a detailed knowledge of BaP emissions from residential wood combustion furnaces.

It was demonstrated that, for a wide range of BaP concentrations, sampling from the hot flue gas of residential wood combustors can be carried out effectively over a simple quartz filter, after proper dilution with cold purified air. Highest BaP emissions from the investigated boilers occurred during start, with a mean concentration value of 6.3 μg m-3. All values refer to standard conditions (273.15 °C, 100 kPa) and to an O2 volume fraction of 13% in the dry flue gas. The lowest concentrations occurred during full load operation (mean value 73 ng m-3 at STP). It was found that, amongst all flue gas compounds analysed, elemental carbon is the parameter most closely related to BaP. This work demonstrates, at optimal operating conditions, modern automatic wood boilers have potentially lowest BaP emission concentrations amongst residential wood combustion furnaces.


Scientific Journals | 2018

Impact of Oxidizing Honeycomb Catalysts Integrated in Firewood Stoves on Emissions under Real-Life Operating Conditions

Reichert G, Schmidl C, Haslinger W, Stressler H, Sturmlechner R, Schwabl M, Wöhler M, Hochenauer C. Impact of Oxidizing Honeycomb Catalysts Integrated in Firewood Stoves on Emissions under Real-Life Operating Conditions. Fuel Processing Technology. 2018; 117: 300-313.

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Catalytic systems integrated in firewood stoves represent a secondary measure for emission reduction. This study evaluates the impact on emissions of two types of honeycomb catalysts integrated in different firewood stoves. The tests were conducted under real-life related testing conditions. The pressure drop induced by the catalyst's carrier geometry affects primary combustion conditions which can influence the emissions. A negative primary effect reduces the catalytic efficiency and has to be considered for developing catalyst integrated solutions. However, a significant net emission reduction was observed. The ceramic catalyst reduced CO emissions by 83%. The metallic catalyst reduced CO emissions by 93% which was significantly better compared to the ceramic catalyst. The net emission reduction of OGC (~30%) and PM (~20%) was similar for both types of catalysts. In most cases, the “Ecodesign” emission limit values, which will enter into force in 2022 for new stoves, were met although the ignition and preheating batches were respected. PM emission composition showed a lower share of elemental (EC) and organic carbon (OC) with integrated catalyst. However, no selectivity towards more reduction of EC or OC was observed. Further investigations should evaluate the long term stability under real-life operation in the field and the effect of the catalyst on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions.


Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals | 2017

Online experiments and modelling with a detailed reaction scheme of single particle biomass pyrolysis.

Anca-Couce A, Sommersacher P, Scharler R. Online experiments and modelling with a detailed reaction scheme of single particle biomass pyrolysis. Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis. Available online 17 July 2017

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Detailed reaction schemes and experimental data for the online release of pyrolysis volatiles are required to gain a more fundamental understanding of biomass pyrolysis, which would in turn allow the process to be controlled in a more precise way and the development of more targeted applications. A detailed online characterisation of pyrolysis products has been conducted in single particle experiments with spruce pellets at different temperatures, obtaining a good closure of the elemental mass balances. The yields and online release of CO, CO2, H2O, CH4, other light hydrocarbons and total organic condensable species, as well as char yield and composition, can be predicted with a reasonable accuracy with the application of a single particle model, coupled with a detailed pyrolysis scheme, and a simple one-step scheme for tar cracking. In order to achieve it, improvements have been conducted in the pyrolysis scheme, mainly concerning the release of light hydrocarbons and char yield and composition. Deviations are still present in the different groups in which organic condensable species can be classified.


Other Presentations | 2017

Bidirektionale Wärmenetze: Regelung, Energiemanagement, Potenzial

Lichtenegger K, Leitner A, Moser A, Muschick D, Höftberger E, Gölles M. Bidirektionale Wärmenetze: Regelung, Energiemanagement, Potenzial. Workshop auf der Central European Biomass Conference 2017.

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