Publication | Reviewed Conference Papers | Modellierung und Simulation

Biomass-Based Heating and Hot Water Supply Systems for Prefabricated, High Energy Performance Houses: a Comparison of System Configurations and Control Strategies

Carlon E, Schwarz M, Prada A, Verma V, Baratieri M, Gasparella A, Schmidl C

Published 22 May 2016

ISSN: 87-91606-28-4 (vol 3)

Citation: Carlon E, Schwarz M, Prada A, Verma V, Baratieri M, Gasparella A, Schmidl C. Biomass-Based Heating and Hot Water Supply Systems for Prefabricated, High Energy Performance Houses: a Comparison of System Configurations and Control Strategies. 12th REHVA World Congress CLIMA 2016 (full paper review and oral presentation). 22 May 2016, Aalborg, Denmark.

Abstract

Nowadays prefabricated houses are becoming increasingly popular, thanks to their low cost and high energy performance. Heating systems installed in these houses should be carefully designed and controlled, to ensure sufficient thermal comfort while maintaining low fuel consumptions. This study presents the simulation of different system configurations and control strategies for a pre-fabricated house, located in Lower Austria. The house is heated by a 6 kW pellet boiler directly connected to a floor heating system, in a configuration without buffer storage tank. Using the TRNSYS simulation suite, a coupled simulation of the house and its heating and hot water supply system was set up, calibrated and validated with reference to monitoring data. As monitoring data evidenced that the control strategy of the heating system is not ideal to maintain a comfortable indoor temperature during the whole day, two improved strategies were simulated over the heating season and evaluated in terms of thermal comfort, pellet consumption and boiler’s efficiency. Moreover, to better understand the influence of the system configuration, simulations have been repeated considering another heat distribution system (radiators instead of floor heating). Results show that the radiators’ network, if adequately controlled, reduces by 85% the total discomfort time. In addition, the pellet boiler mainly operates in load modulation regime, leading to lower pellet supply rates and therefore to lower pellet consumptions (18% less than floor heating). However, the lower operational loads and frequent ignitions result in a slightly lower efficiency of the pellet boiler (4% less than the configuration with floor heating.

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